J6 Unmasked: Security footage shows Pelosi evacuating Hollywood-style from Capitol as daughter films

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    Nancy Pelosi, a former speaker of the House, said having to flee a chaotic Capitol on January 6, 2021, traumatizing. However, Capitol Police video footage obtained by Just the News reveals that on that fatal day, the longtime Democratic leader left the Capitol building in Hollywood fashion with her daughter photographing her as security guards attempted to bring her down a covert safe passageway.

    Three distinct perspectives of Pelosi’s escape on January 6 are shown in the video, which was made accessible by House Speaker Kevin McCarthy and originally broadcast on the “Just the News, No Noise” television program on Real America’s Voice on Thursday night. Each shows the mother’s delegation moving quickly through the hallways, accompanied by members of the Capitol Police protective detail, as her daughter Alexandra roams around with a camera.

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    Due to the lack of demonstrators or rioters in the evacuation route, the film demonstrates that then-Speaker Pelosi was not in danger after leaving the breached Capitol chamber. Congress received confirmation from Capitol Police that the woman in the video holding the camera was Alexandra Pelosi.

    After seeing the evacuation video for the first time on Thursday, Steven Sund, the former Capitol Police chief who was removed following the tragedy on January 6, expressed his grave concern that Pelosi’s actions that day placed an unneeded burden on her security team.
    “When you look at the footage, what you need to realize is a protective detail is specifically for the protectee. You’re there, you’re protecting the protectee,” Sund told Just the News. “Now, Capitol Police statutorily do have the authority to protect family members. And it’s my understanding the person holding the camera was Pelosi’s daughter. But she’s there in the position of being media.

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    “The protective detail isn’t there to protect media. And whoever else was there with her for the sole purpose of videotaping creates a major distraction for the protective detail,” he added. “You know, they don’t train to protect those additional people.”

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    Sund claimed that the filming activity probably had an impact on the specialized vehicle used to transport Pelosi to a secure area at Fort McNair.

    “There’s a limited number of seats in the armored vehicles that, you know, if you’re going to put one of those additional people into the armored personnel carrier, or the armored vehicle, you’re going to lose one of your security detail. And that’s not what’s meant to happen so it creates a distraction.”

    Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of the Georgia Republican Party responded to recently revealed Capitol surveillance tape showing Pelosi being recorded by her daughter during the evacuation.
    “They use that situation to film it so that their family can make millions of dollars later by selling the video footage and a documentary,” she said. “I believe that is one of the most abusive things.”

    Former Illinois Representative Rodney Davis, the chair of the House Administration Committee at the time of the riot, stated that on January 6, 2021, a Republican congressional leader being recorded by a family member during the evacuation would receive different treatment.

    “If they had somebody, even a family member, filming them, they would have gotten a subpoena in front of the January 6th select committee,” he said.

    The majority of the surveillance tape showing Pelosi, her daughter, and the security detail on the route was not blurred, although Just the News obscured some of the film that might have exposed security precautions along the hidden escape route.

    In the upcoming month, Just the News plans to release a number of additional never-before-seen security tapes from the Jan. 6 riot that highlight security lapses and raise issues the Democrat-led House Jan. 6 select committee failed to address.

    Alexandra Pelosi has admitted to filming her mother that day and utilizing some of the material to create the “Pelosi in the House” documentary, which was broadcast on HBO last December. That video showed Pelosi at various points during the disturbance, but unlike the security film, it did not demonstrate how the video operation affected the security detail.
    Pelosi claimed on January 7, 2021, that many Capitol Hill employees had been frightened by the disturbance the previous day.

    “What’s sad about it is, of course, as members of Congress we sign up for the exposure that we have, but to see in the eyes of so many of the staff people especially the younger ones the trauma, the fright that it was for them to be locked into rooms with terrorists banging on the doors, hiding under desks, under tables and the rest of that. They did not sign up for that. We did not sign them up for that,” she said at a news conference the day after the riot.

    “It’s a blessing to be interested in public service, to learn from it here, perhaps to go on into public service but to carry that important value into whatever they do in life but to see, to meet with them and to see how frightened they were, how traumatized they were, because these thugs, these Trump thugs, decided they would desecrate the Capitol with no thought of what harm they might do physically, psychologically or any other way. And they will be prosecuted. Justice will be done,” she added.

    Alexandra Pelosi claimed in January of this year that her mother never legally authorized her to film her for the HBO project.

    “A lot of it was filmed without her consent. She never gave me permission to film her. A lot of it’s filmed on an iPhone. This is what you call vérité, so it’s in the moment,” she said. “It’s just that over the course of many years, I saw interesting things happening and I turned my phone on.”

    She jokingly said her mother wouldn’t take her to court over the documentary. She claimed, “She likes me enough that she wouldn’t sue me.

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